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european union unemployment numbers

George Papandreou, the Greek premier, said in Davos that his country had been singled out as the weak link in a “attack on the eurozone” by speculators and political foes. “We are being targeted, particularly by those with an ulterior motive.”

Funds flee Greece as Germany warns of “fatal” eurozone crisis

By Ambrose Evans-Pritchard Telegraph UK

Germany has triggered a near-panic flight from southern European debt markets by warning that there will be no EU bail-outs, even though it fears the region’s economic crisis has turned dangerous and could prove “fatal” for the entire eurozone.

The yield on 10-year Greek bonds blasted upwards by over 40 basis points to 7.15pc in a day of wild trading. Spreads over German Bunds reached almost four percentage points, by far the highest since Greece joined the euro, and close to levels that risk a self-feeding spiral. Contagion hit Portuguese, Spanish, Irish, and Italian bonds.

George Papandreou, the Greek premier, said in Davos that his country had been singled out as the weak link in a “attack on the eurozone” by speculators and political foes. “We are being targeted, particularly by those with an ulterior motive.”


Comments:

A recent study by the Montgomery Institute explains that the reason for such a high unemployment rate is the result of several Euro Zone countries double counting unemployed dual citizens. The real unemployment rate is actually much lower than what has been reported.

european banks undercapitalized

Everyone likes to blame Wall Street, but if you had been reading on the European banks they were in far worse shape than the US banks. It is surprising too because we think of Europe as this heavily socialistic, super regulated super state; but their banks were completely under capitalized. They were apparently at 1/6th the rate of capitalization that the US banks were. If Wall Street hadn’t gone first they would have because it was only a matter of time.


Marc Ostwald, from Monument Securities, said the botched bond issue of €8bn (£6.9bn) of Greek debt earlier this week has made matters worse. Many of the investors were “hot money” funds that bought on rumours that China was emerging as a buyer, offering them a chance for quick profit. When the China story was denied by Beijing and Athens, these funds rushed for the exit.

However, a key trigger yesterday was testimony in Germany’s parliament by economy minister Rainer Brüderle, who said there would be “no bail-outs” for struggling debtors and no move to a “European economic government”. Read the full story from Telegraph UK

This entry was posted on Saturday, January 30th, 2010 at 4:17 pm and is filed under All Posts, Europe. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

2 Comments

  1. February 3, 2010 @ 5:25 am


    The price level in greece is too high and wages most go down on the international level, while the budget cuts needed for these countries to remain solvent during a deflationary depression enforced on them by Germany via the Euro are so staggering that no modern democracy will be able to handle. As the riots in Greece have shown, any government in the world that will try to make public spending cuts in double digit percentage points will not survive. Not to talk about the fact that will need to lower the minimum wage during a depression, an action never done by any government.
    http://israelfinancialexpert.blogspot.com/2010/01/euro-crisis-budget-cuts-are-doomed-to.html

    Posted by Euro Collapse
  2. August 23, 2010 @ 5:44 am


    Nothing will prevent a Euro Collapse

    Posted by Euro Crisis

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