Canadian banking haven myth exposed

Canadian banking haven myth exposed

"One of the reasons that Canadians (and international commentators, other finance ministers and global financial institutions) buy this Canadian banking fairy tale is the way the government accounts for the money borrowed to support the banks." The sorry spectacle of Conservat

Read More

Get rid of your mortgage, loans, because interest rates set to rise

Get rid of your mortgage, loans, because interest rates set to rise

Get rid of your loans, guys and gals, because we are going into a high interest rate period. Very high. It will be the equivalent of going into the double digit interest rates we had in the 80s where many people threw their house keys at the bank and we had record numbers of ba

Read More

E-cigarettes save lives, money

E-cigarettes save lives, money

"We know that cigarettes have thousands of chemicals in them and we know that they are killing us. They have been for over a hundred years. So now, the e-cig industry comes along with only one or two chemicals in their mixture and people are freaking out over these as well. Whe

Read More

US inches closer to big bank charges

US inches closer to big bank charges

Federal prosecutors are nearing criminal charges against some of the world’s biggest banks, according to lawyers briefed on the matter, a development that could produce the first guilty plea from a major bank in more than two decades. In doing so, prosecutors are confronting

Read More

Canada’s home sales top predictions; why a real estate crash is inevitable

Canada’s home sales top predictions; why a real estate crash is inevitable

“The assurance of relatively low borrowing costs has likely given home buyers confidence while rising home values have kept new listings at a healthy level. Stable employment has provided some assurance to owners and buyers alike.” Our website is back after many months of

Read More

Comparing today’s recession/depression to the 1980 recession

Comparing today's recession/depression to the 1980 recession

"Much like today, Americans were concerned not only with high unemployment but increasing budget deficits in the early 1980s. A September 1983 Gallup poll found that three-fourths of the public agreed that the federal government's budget deficit was a great threat (42%) or some

Read More

Why savers are getting screwed

Why savers are getting screwed

"Without the intervention of economic policymakers, interest rates would be naturally higher. That would increase the cost of borrowing for businesses and consumers, but there would be some offsetting economic benefits. Savers are getting screwed by the current monetary policy

Read More

Geithner admits USA bankrupt to US Senate

Geithner admits USA bankrupt to US Senate

"Never in our history has Congress failed to increase the debt limit when necessary. Failure to raise the limit would precipitate a default by the United States. Default would effectively impose a significant and long-lasting tax on all Americans and all American businesses

Read More

World economies on verge of currency revaluations to deal with debt

World economies on verge of currency revaluations to deal with debt

"It is well enough that people of the nation do not understand our banking and monetary system, for if they did, I believe there would be a revolution before tomorrow morning." -- Henry Ford Basically what the world central banks are doing is increasing their money by devaluin

Read More

Is Obama the next Mugabe of Zimbabwe?

Is Obama the next Mugabe of Zimbabwe?

"America, Britain, Japan, Germany, France, Sweden, Holland, Norway, Canada and Australia make up the Fishmongers Group and their meeting on Tuesday will deliberate on the state of the inclusive government, debt relief, public finance administration and the controversial economi

Read More

US raiding foreign countries with dollars, not soldiers

US raiding foreign countries with dollars, not soldiers

""The United States is going to China and saying: we want you to commit economic suicide, just like Japan did. We want you to follow the same thing: we want you to revalue your currency, we want you to squeeze your companies, we want you to go bankrupt,” says Michael Hudson,

Read More

FDIC wants your retirement cash to save banks: Bloomberg

FDIC wants your retirement cash to save banks: Bloomberg

“The FDIC is constantly looking at structures where we can get the greatest opportunity to tap into capital that we have not had the success reaching through previous disposition methods,” FDIC spokeswoman Michele Heller said in an e-mailed statement. “We welcome and work

Read More

Content By: The Coming Depression Editorial Staff (dates cited below)
Copyright: include link to this article on top of reproduction if you use it.
Bookmark and Share
(No Ratings Yet)
Loading ... Loading ...

chavez meets obongo joker socialist

“The card emerged when goods began to become scarce,” Suchlicki said. “The government had seized many companies that did not work because the government managed them poorly. Then they decided to distribute groceries through those cards.” — ANTONIO MARIA DELGADO

Presented by President Hugo Chávez as an instrument to make shopping for groceries easier, the “Good Life Card” is making various segments of the population wary because they see it as a furtive attempt to introduce a rationing card similar to the one in Cuba.

The measure could easily become a mechanism to control the population, according to civil society groups.

“We see that in short-term this could become a rationing card probably similar to the one used in Cuba,” Roberto León Parilli, president of the National Association of Users and Consumers, told El Nuevo Herald. “It would use more advanced technological means [than those used in Cuba], but when they tell you where to buy and what the limits of what you can buy are, they are conditioning your purchases.”

Chávez said Tuesday that the card could be used to buy groceries at the government chain of markets and supplies.

“I have called it a Good Life Card so far,” Chávez said in a brief statement made on the government television channel. “It’s a card for you to purchase what you are going to take and they keep deducting. It’s to buy what you need, not to promote communism, but to buy what just what you need.”

Former director of Venezuela’s Central Bank, Domingo Maza Zavala, said this could become a rationing card that would limit your purchases in light of the country’s recurring problems with supplies.

“If the intention is to beat inflation, they should find a good source of supply for the entire market and not only for centers that are part of social chains,” he said. “To do that, you need to encourage local production with the help of the private sector, since they cannot do it by themselves. The government cannot become the ultimate food distributor.”

Humberto Ortega Díaz, minister for public banking and president of the Venezuelan Bank, minimized such criticism and said that all this measure is trying to do is to improve service at the government supply chains.

“Why can’t our Bicentennial chain use a card to make it easier for customers to buy their groceries?” the minister said in an interview broadcast on a government channel. He said that this type of initiative has been used by private commercial entities.

Yet, critics pointed out that the measure could turn out not as innocent as the minister makes it to be, and they insist that the government control over the supply chain is too broad and depends greatly on imports the government authorizes through its currency exchange system.

In theory, the government could begin to favor the import of products to be sold through the government chains and have more control over the type of products purchased and the people buying them.

Jaime Suchlicki, director of the University of Miami’s Institute for Cuban and Cuban-American Studies, said that Venezuela’s current problems of scarce supplies are very similar to those Cuba faced when Fidel Castro introduced the rationing card.

Chavez building a country of slaves

Is it safe to assume that an allegedly democratically elected leader would stand up for democratic beliefs such as free speech? Chavez, while once upon a time elected democratically, has been doing everything in his power to destroy the very same democratic system under which he was elected.

May we bring up the closing of the RCTV station, a station heavily opposed to him? How about a completely unconstitutional referendum, a year after the SAME referendum failed miserably, effectively destroying the “term limits” and increasing the term lengths. To put this in perspective, or more so that people can understand: Imagine George W. Bush passing a bill that expands his term to 6 years instead of 4, and allows him to be re-elected more than twice.

venezuela food shortage

May we also bring up the defamation of national symbols, such as the coat of arms, the national flag, even the national hero, Simon Bolivar?
We know not every world leader is not perfect, but there aren’t many who do much more bad than good for their country and countrymen than Chavez.

Erikthered writes: I’m a Venezuelan who moved to Canada 3 years ago. I only want to say something for those Canadians who support Chavez: Please go and live there for a few months or at least a year and come back here with your conclusions.

I can give you my perspective and the reason I moved here, but it would be too long and I insist that going there is the best thing you could do.

Chavez is just only one of the reasons I left. There were a number of problems that existed before Chavez like insecurity, economy, etc… It was deteriorating anyways, but with Chavez the deterioration was much faster.

Related posts:

  1. Venezuelans ordered 3 minute showers as depression worsens“Some people sing in the shower, in the shower half an hour. No kids, three minutes is more than enough. I’ve counted, three minutes, and I don’t stink,” Chavez said....
  2. Venezuela devalues currency by 50 percent; Sucre planned as new currency“Venezuela’s decision to devalue the Bolivar culminates an event that the market has been anticipating for a long time,” said Walter Molano, an analyst at BCP Securities. “It helps alleviate...
  3. Banks close credit card accounts without warning“It is kind of an extraordinary action, but these are extraordinary times,” said Ben Woolsey, director of marketing and consumer research for CreditCards.com. — Balimore Sun The media and business...
  4. Venezuelan inflation rate hits 30 percent; South American currency planned“That’s an incredible surge,” Adrian Aguirre, an economist at Caracas-based Bancaribe SA, said in a telephone interview. “The fact that food prices rose by more than 11 percent is something...
  5. Export bans, increasing protectionism major reason for food inflation“Zoellick said he expects food prices to continue to rise, and that export bans and weather disruptions are partly to blame.” He also said global food prices have hit “dangerous...
  6. Caribbean orders extreme measures as depression deepens“The energy situation we face is critical and if we do not adopt extreme measures we will have to revert to planned blackouts affecting the population,” said a recently circulated...

This entry was posted on Sunday, September 5th, 2010 at 11:51 pm and is filed under South America. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Comment

Please note: Comment moderation is enabled and may delay your comment. There is no need to resubmit your comment.


Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights. "