Content By: The Coming Depression Editorial Staff (dates cited below)
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camden police

“Camden City Council, as expected, voted Thursday to lay off almost 400 workers, half of them police officers and firefighters, to bridge a $26.5 million deficit. That’s about a quarter of the city’s entire work force.”

Five members of City Council voted unanimously to approve the layoff plan — two other members were absent. The cuts take effect in mid-January.

Walco Camden City Council Approves Massive Police And Fire Layoffs. Exactly how many city workers will be affected is still an open question, although nearly half the city’s police and a third of the firefighters are slated to go.

Karl Walco (right) is with the union that represents non-uniformed Camden city workers.
walco camden police

“If we agreed to everything that the city proposed in concessions, it would only have a minor impact on the number of layoffs,” Walco told the council members.

No argument from Council. They sat impassively as workers and residents alike voiced their frustration.

United STRAITS of America: The Muni Bond Crisis Is Here by Robert Prechter

This November, the whole world tuned in as the greater part of the U.S.A.’s 50 states turned red — and no, I don’t mean the political shift to a republican majority during the November 2 mid-term elections. I mean “in the red” — as in, financially fercockt, overdrawn, up to their eyeballs in debt.

Here are the latest stats: California, Florida, Illinois, and New Jersey now suffer “Greek-like deficits,” alongside draconian budget cuts, job furloughs, suspensions of city services, and the growing “rent-a-cop” trend of firing city workers and then hiring outside contractors to fill those positions.

Next is the fact that the municipal bond market has been melting like a snow cone in the Sahara desert. According to recent data, 35 muni bond issues totaling $1.5 billion have defaulted since January 2010, three times the average annualized rate going back to 1983. Also, in the week ending November 19, investors withdrew a record $3.1 billion from mutual and exchange-traded funds specializing in municipal debt, triggering the largest one-day rise in yields since the panic of ’08.

In the words of a recent LA Times article “It’s a cold, cold world in the municipal bond market right now.”

And for those who never saw the muni bond crisis coming, it’s a lot colder.

Since at least 2008, the mainstream experts extolled munis for their “safe haven resistance to recession.” And while muni bond woes are only now making headlines, one of the few sources that foresaw the depth and degree of the crisis coming ahead of time was Elliott Wave International’s team of analysts. Here’s an excerpt from the April 2008 Elliott Wave Financial Forecast (EWFF):

“One of the most vulnerable sectors of the debt markets is the municipal bond market. Instead of being a source of state and local funding, many residents will become a cost. Default could hit at any moment after times get difficult… Yields on tax-exempt municipal bonds are above yields on US Treasuries for the first time in as long as anyone can remember, another sign of how limited the supply of quality bonds will become.”

EWI continued to warn subscribers ever since:

February 2009 EWFF: Special section “Out of the Frying Pan and into Munis” showed the continued rise in muni yields ABOVE Treasury yields and cautioned against the idea that tax-exempt debt was a “safe bet.”

September 2010 Elliott Wave Theorist: “The Next Disaster: The public has withdrawn some money from stock mutual funds… But most investors … are shunning treasuries for high-yield money market funds and bond funds, which hold less-than-pristine corporate and municipal debt.”

Read more about Robert Prechter’s warnings for holders of municipals and other bonds in his free report: The Next Major Disaster Developing for Bond Holders. Access your free 10-page report now.

Applicants Battle Cold For Govt. Help by Jennifer Griffies

marietta cold line

Despite the freezing temperatures, hundreds fought for a place in line in Marietta to apply for federal aid to help pay their heat and power bills this winter.
Only 30 people were being let in at a time at the assistance center in Marietta.

“It was freezing,” applicant Linda Benefield told WSB-TV. “I was in line for three hours and 15 minutes, but I needed the help.”

Some needed even more help just to deal with the cold. Ambulances were cold in and took at least two people to the hospital because of the freezing temperatures .

“People just couldn’t stand the cold,” said applicant Deandre Marshall. “They were not letting people in fast enough.”

Marshall said people in line were crying, afraid they would not even get a chance to apply.

“I never thought I would be in the line,” Marshall said. “It’s almost like being in a soup line during the great depression.”

The money is offered through a network of agencies in Georgia. Source

This entry was posted on Thursday, December 2nd, 2010 at 9:47 pm and is filed under All Posts, Survival Tips. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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